gingerhaze:

cute teen Lumberjanes, just for fun! **this is not canon in any way i just like messing around with character designs**

griefseed:

he does nt even know

foxnewsofficial:

good

takitakos:

5, 6, 7 /05

Don’t ask, because I don’t really know what this is all about.

shade-shypervert:

Some stuff from my sketchbook. Was drawing dragons with open mouth… 

I’m gonna answer this in a row, because I’m so bored. (We did it that way in the old times, you know?)

1. How old would you be if you didn’t know how old you are? - 23
2. If life is so short, why do we do so many things we don’t like and like so many things we don’t do? - Because we long for the things we can’t do. 
3. What is the one thing you’d most like to change about the world? - Patriarchy, I guess. 
4. If the average human life span was 40 years, how would you live your life differently? - I’m assuming that society would be structured around that fact, so that I would live a very similar life but in a much shorter time. (and I would be freaking out right now)
5. Are you more worried about doing things right, or doing the right things? - The first.
6. If you could offer a newborn child only one piece of advice, what would it be? - Hmm, maybe to stay close to whatever makes you happy. 
Would you break the law to save a loved one? - Yeah, definitely. Unless it means taking another person’s life. 
7. What’s something you know you do differently than most people? - Relate to people.
8. What one thing have you not done that you really want to do?  What’s holding you back? - Going to a surf camp. Money holds me back.
9. Are you holding onto something you need to let go of? - Maybe.
10. If you had to move to a state or country besides the one you currently live in, where would you move and why? - Canada. Because canadians are lovely people. 
11. Why are you, you? - Because of a mix of genetic material and life circumstances, basically. 
12. Which is worse, when a good friend moves away, or losing touch with a good friend who lives right near you? - I suppose the first because it’s more drastic. 
13. What are you most grateful for? - Life?
14. Would you rather lose all of your old memories, or never be able to make new ones? - It looks like the exact same thing: not knowing who you are, or not knowing who you are anymore. I assume that the first will allow you to go on with your life? So maybe that one.
15. Has your greatest fear ever come true? - No, thanks god.
16. Do you remember that time 5 years ago when you were extremely upset?  Does it really matter now? - Yeah. It changed my life drastically. Everything matters.
17. What is your happiest childhood memory?  What makes it so special? - The time I went to Ireland with my father. It was filled with good feelings, and a little magic. 
18. Have you ever been with someone, said nothing, and walked away feeling like you just had the best conversation ever? - No. 
19. If you just won a million dollars, would you quit your job? - It depends on the job. I’ll probably allow myself to look for something better.
20. What is the difference between being alive and truly living? - It’s a matter of perception. Everything can be amazing if you just allow it to be. (but, of course, being angry or frustrated is OK too)
21. What would you do differently if you knew nobody would judge you? - I would dress however I want, sing wherever I want, and be a little more crazy in general. 
22. Decisions are being made right now.  The question is:  Are you making them for yourself, or are you letting others make them for you? - Some of both.

lokicosplaymonkishu:

Loki Cosplay - back in Stuttgart 02-05 by ~Stephanie-dono
inprnt:

"Portrait of a Family" by Jessica Warrick on INPRNT
coelasquid:

underunderstood:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

This is an important event in history, especially Canadian and feminist history. So I’m going to tell you more about it.
1) The shooter had been rejected from Ecole Polytechnique prior to the shooting. He blamed this on these female students, claiming that they were feminists who ruined his life.
2) In the first classroom he entered, he demanded the men leave before shooting at the women. No man attempted to stop him as they left. Take that as you will. (Later on, several men did get injured trying to stop him in the hallways.)
3) In his suicide letter, he believed that feminists were attempting to be more powerful than men, and were trying to take men’s rights away.4) Feminists were actually blamed by some for the massacre. The line of logic was “if feminists didn’t make women’s rights an issue, Levine wouldn’t have wanted to kill feminists!” Victim blaming at its finest.
5) The mainstream news media often did not publicize the outrage from women’s groups, and often preferred those who took a calm approach. Ironic, that.
6) Despite him literally having a hit list of feminist icons in his final letter, several newscasters questioned whether or not the shooting was a sexist act, some even denying the idea outright.
8) Many memorials for the victims have been created, and rightly so; however, some prominent ones were erected in poor neighbourhoods where many Native women were killed every day in the same time period as the shooting (see: Marker of Change, Vancouver) (see: Missing Women, Vancouver). Basically, white feminism happened. 
The entire event was nothing short of a tragedy, and I recommend that everyone read up on it and the resulting aftermath. It’s… interesting to see how the media tried to turn it into a random act of psychopathy instead of what it was (we know better now, luckily). The reactions (memorials, etc) to the deaths of these 14 White, middle class women as compared to the deaths of 60+ Native, lower class women are also “interesting” to compare. (By interesting, I mean infuriating.)

It’s also an important event because after it happened Canada was like “oh shit better expedite that whole gun control thing” and then did. I feel like this situation is so completely ignored when Americans talk about gun control, like the examples the American left always trot out are like “look at how well gun control works in Europe” and opponents say “well gun culture is completely different here you can’t just take them all away all of the sudden and expect that to work”. But Canada has a lot of guns AND regulates ownership to successfully cut down on gun crime, violence, and accidents. It was a pretty clear line of “this is a problem that requires legislation” and the necessary change was made. People grumbled a lot, but the shift happened.

coelasquid:

underunderstood:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

This is an important event in history, especially Canadian and feminist history. So I’m going to tell you more about it.

1) The shooter had been rejected from Ecole Polytechnique prior to the shooting. He blamed this on these female students, claiming that they were feminists who ruined his life.

2) In the first classroom he entered, he demanded the men leave before shooting at the women. No man attempted to stop him as they left. Take that as you will. (Later on, several men did get injured trying to stop him in the hallways.)

3) In his suicide letter, he believed that feminists were attempting to be more powerful than men, and were trying to take men’s rights away.
4) Feminists were actually blamed by some for the massacre. The line of logic was “if feminists didn’t make women’s rights an issue, Levine wouldn’t have wanted to kill feminists!” Victim blaming at its finest.

5) The mainstream news media often did not publicize the outrage from women’s groups, and often preferred those who took a calm approach. Ironic, that.

6) Despite him literally having a hit list of feminist icons in his final letter, several newscasters questioned whether or not the shooting was a sexist act, some even denying the idea outright.

8) Many memorials for the victims have been created, and rightly so; however, some prominent ones were erected in poor neighbourhoods where many Native women were killed every day in the same time period as the shooting (see: Marker of Change, Vancouver) (see: Missing Women, Vancouver). Basically, white feminism happened. 

The entire event was nothing short of a tragedy, and I recommend that everyone read up on it and the resulting aftermath. It’s… interesting to see how the media tried to turn it into a random act of psychopathy instead of what it was (we know better now, luckily). The reactions (memorials, etc) to the deaths of these 14 White, middle class women as compared to the deaths of 60+ Native, lower class women are also “interesting” to compare. (By interesting, I mean infuriating.)

It’s also an important event because after it happened Canada was like “oh shit better expedite that whole gun control thing” and then did. I feel like this situation is so completely ignored when Americans talk about gun control, like the examples the American left always trot out are like “look at how well gun control works in Europe” and opponents say “well gun culture is completely different here you can’t just take them all away all of the sudden and expect that to work”. But Canada has a lot of guns AND regulates ownership to successfully cut down on gun crime, violence, and accidents. It was a pretty clear line of “this is a problem that requires legislation” and the necessary change was made. People grumbled a lot, but the shift happened.

pythosart:

It’s about time I did some Nimona fanart! It’s pretty much everything I love, all wrapped up in one excellent comic

pythosart:

It’s about time I did some Nimona fanart! It’s pretty much everything I love, all wrapped up in one excellent comic